Origin and Description

Columbus Hops is one of the Three C's, including Centennial and Cascade. This variety also has other names including CTZ, which stands for Columbus, Tomahawk, and Zeus. Tomahawk is the exact same variety, while Zeus hops is so bitterly close that it gets lumped in. The naming struggle has to do with copyrights and patents between Yakima Chief, Inc, and Charles E. Zimmerman who originally produced the variety. This resulted in a joint venture going by the name of HUSA-CEZ, LLC between Charles and Hopunion USA.

With the confusing history put aside, Columbus Hops makes a great dual purpose hops in beer. It brings both a bitterness kick to the table as well as strong dreamy aroma. Columbus brings a 14%-16% alpha acid rating to the table, making it ideal for laying the bitter foundation for beers such as Pale Ales, India Pale Ales, Stouts, and anything Imperial. In the same capacity this variety is commonly used for late-boil or dry hopping for its herbal, earthy character. The aroma is pleasing and citrus notes may be found in fresh batches.

The oil content within Columbus Hops is moderate, and the essential oils are relatively balanced. It is a moderate yielding plant edging towards the higher side, and is grown widely in the U.S. This variety produces medium to large compact cones, and the lupulin is on the paler side of yellow. Some of the most forward looking breweries in the U.S. are using Columbus to flavor their American Style Ales.